The Health Benefits Of Mushrooms

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The Heath Benefits of Mushrooms

Mushrooms had always  a special place in our family traditional and home remedy cooking. My mom would make the recipe I am sharing below every time someone gets sick with a cold to boost our immune system.  Mushrooms have long been celebrated as a source of powerful nutrients .Often grouped with vegetables, mushrooms provide many of the nutritional attributes of produce, as well as attributes more commonly found in meat, beans or grains. Mushrooms are low in calories, fat-free, cholesterol-free and very low in sodium, yet they provide several nutrients that are typically found in animal foods or grains. Like all fruits and vegetables, mushrooms are naturally gluten free, and make a delicious and nutritious addition to a gluten-free diet. If you are not a mushroom lover and would still like benefit of it’s properties, You can take this supplement. I use it myself and I am pretty satisfied with it.

 

You don’t have to be picky with the type of mushrooms you eat, as they’re all considered Paleo friendly. These must have been some of the easiest vegetables for pre-modern man to eat, since they just had to find them and pick them from the ground, just making sure not to eat the poisonous ones.

 

Here are some of the health benefits of mushrooms

 

Boost your immune system

A study done on mice and published by the American Society for Nutrition found that white button mushrooms may promote immune function by increasing the production of antiviral and other proteins that are released by cells while they are trying to protect and repair the body’s tissues. A later study showed that these mushrooms promoted the maturation of immune system cells–called dendritic cells–from bone marrow. According to he researchers, this may help enhance the body’s immunity leading to better defence systems against invading microbes.

 

 Helps with Anemia

Anemic patients are characterized by having low levels of iron in their blood, resulting in fatigue, headaches, reduced neural function, and digestive issues. Mushrooms are a good source of iron, and over 90% of the nutritive iron value can be absorbed by the body, which promotes the formation of red blood cells and keeps people healthy and functioning at their full potential.

 

Safeguard Against Cancer

Mushrooms are rich in disease-fighting phytochemicals, and eating them regularly has been linked to a lower risk of breast cancer in studies of Chinese and Korean women. Mushrooms also prevent prostate cancer cells from multiplying in mice and might do the same in men.

 

White Mushroom for Weight Loss

This category includes the familiar button mushroom, cremini and the Portobello. The white mushroom has a special carbohydrate that stokes the metabolic fire and maintains blood sugar levels. A strong metabolism means more burned fat. Three ounces per day for four to six weeks has been said to yield substantial weight loss (this does not mean that exercise and healthy eating is not required). These mushrooms are also high in selenium which not only aids weight loss but is showing to have positive effects on prostate cancer.

 

Preparation and Serving Tips

Don’t wash mushrooms; they absorb water like a sponge. Use a mushroom brush or wipe with a barely damp cloth. Don’t cut mushrooms until you’re ready to use them; they’ll darken. Use the trimmed stems to flavor soups. Mushrooms cook quickly. Overcooking makes them rubbery and tough. If you saute, go easy on vegetable oil. They’ll absorb it like water and become greasy. Try cooking them in a bit of wine instead. Due to their high water content, mushrooms add liquid to a dish once they cook down.

 

Good for sexual health

Mushroom includes a great deal of zinc. This can help in restoration of the genital organs along with a much better sexual life at the conclusion of an exhausting day, specifically for males. The sperm count in addition improves on frequent consumption of mushroom.

 

This is what mama use to make us:

Baked mushrooms and eggs
1 tbsp olive oil
50g butter
2 shallots, peeled and finely sliced
6 flat mushrooms/one pound chestnut or button mushrooms/one pound wild mushrooms; cleaned, trimmed and chopped
3 sprigs tarragon leaves chopped. Or you can use dry and get it here.
4 tbsp creme fraiche
3 eggs
Sea Salt and pepper

1.  Heat the oil in the pan over a medium heat and add a generous knob of butter. Add the shallots and cook gently for 7 or so minutes to soften, stirring regularly to avoid burning.

2.  Add all but a tsp of butter and the mushrooms, turn the heat up and fry the mushrooms so that they get a bit of colour. Continue cooking, moving so they cook evenly, until they start to soften and the liquid evaporates . Add salt, pepper and tarragon to taste. Remove from the heat and set aside.

3.  Preheat the oven to 350F. Butter 4 small ramekins. Divide the mushrooms between the 4 ramekins ( I use these le creuset ones) . Spoon in half the creme fraiche. Make a dip in the centre of each ramekin and crack an egg in, being careful not to break the yolk. Season with salt and pepper, spoon on the rest of the creme fraiche and put in the oven for about 15 minutes, or until the white is cooked but the yolk is still runny. Serve straight away with toast and salad.

 

For fun: You may try to grow your own mushrooms at home. Get what you need here. This was such a fun project for kids to get them to learn about real foods.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Massiva Ouali BA, LSH, CRTS is a part time blogger, author and a mom on a mission to help her family live a better and healthier life through Mediterranean recipes cooking, natural beauty, personal care and cleaning recipes, successful parenting and much more. The recipes she shares have been tested and approved by her family of 5. Her goal is to help you reach your best in health and wellness. She named her blog after a therapy called '"Raindrop Technique” that she practices. She is a true believer that God’s/Allah's medicine is in the plants and essential oils. Join her on a mission of inhaling blessings and exhaling gratitude.

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